quinta-feira, agosto 14, 2014

Sandcat Browser 5 - A Penetration-Oriented Browser

Sandcat is a lightweight multi-tabbed web browser that combines the speed and power of Chromium and Lua. Sandcat comes with built-in live headers, an extensible user interface and command line console, resource viewer, and many other features that are useful for web developers and pen-testers.

Download: https://www.wuala.com/syhunt/tools

QuasiBot - Webshell Manager aka HTTP Botnet

QuasiBot is a complex webshell manager written in PHP, which operate on web-based backdoors implemented by user himself. Using prepared php backdoors, quasiBot will work as C&C trying to communicate with each backdoor. Tool goes beyond average web-shell managers, since it delivers useful functions for scanning, exploiting and so on. It is quasi-HTTP botnet, therefore it is called.
All data about bots is stored in SQL database, ATM only MySQL is supported. TOR proxy is also supported, the goal was to create secure connection between C&C and backdoors; using SOCKS5, it is able to torify all connections between you and web server. All configuration is stored in config file. QuasiBot it's still under construction so i am aware of any potential bugs.
You will need any web server software; tested on Linux, Apache 2.2 and PHP 5.4.4.
  
How it works?
  • quasiBot is operating on web-shells delivered by user, each backdoor is being verified by md5 hash which changes every hour
    quasiBot (C&C) -[request/verification]-> Bots (Webshells) -[response/verification]-> quasiBot (C&C) -[request/command]-> Bots (Webshells) -[response/execution]-> quasiBot (C&C)                
    
  • Backdoors consists of two types, with and without DDoS module, source code is included and displayed in home page;
  • Connection between C&C and server is being supported by curl, TOR proxy is supported, User Agent is being randomized from an array
    quasiBot (C&C) -[PROXY/TOR]-> Bots (Webshells) <-[PROXY/TOR]- quasiBot (C&C)
    
  • Webshells can be removed and added at 'Settings' tab, they are stored in database
  • 'RSS' tab contain latest exploits and vulnerabilities feeds
  • 'RCE' tab allows to perform Remote Code Execution on specific server using selected PHP function
  • 'Scan' tab allows to resolve IP or URL and perform basic scan using nmap, dig and whois - useful in the phase of gathering information
  • 'Pwn' tab stands for few functions, which generally will help collect informations about server and try to find exploits for currently used OS version using Linux Exploit Suggestor
  • 'MySQL Manager', as the name says, can be used to perform basic operations on specific database - it could be helpful while looking for config files that include mysql connections on remote server; it also displays some informations about it's envoirment
  • 'Run' tab allows you to run specific command on every bots at once
  • 'DDoS' tab allows you to perform UDP DoS attacks using all bots or single one, expanded backdoor is required
  • Whole front-end is maintaned in a pleasant, functional interface

Running quasi for first time

  • Move all files to prepared directory, change default settings in config file (config.php)
  • Visiting quasiBot for the first time will create needed database and it's structure
  • In 'Settings' tab, you are able to add and delete shells, you're ready to go

Todo

  • Authorization system
  • Move Linux Exploit Suggestor to PHP language
  • Add Windows support to 'PWN' module
  • Automatic attacks on servers
  • Backdoors creation (backconnects)
  • Source code cleanup, it's still pretty shitty; amount of required files should be reduced
  • ???
 Download: https://github.com/Smaash/quasibot

HoneyDrive 3 - The Premier Honeypot Linux Distro



HoneyDrive is the premier honeypot Linux distro. It is a virtual appliance (OVA) with Xubuntu Desktop 12.04.4 LTS edition installed. It contains over 10 pre-installed and pre-configured honeypot software packages such as Kippo SSH honeypot, Dionaea and Amun malware honeypots, Honeyd low-interaction honeypot, Glastopf web honeypot and Wordpot, Conpot SCADA/ICS honeypot, Thug and PhoneyC honeyclients and more. Additionally it includes many useful pre-configured scripts and utilities to analyze, visualize and process the data it can capture, such as Kippo-Graph, Honeyd-Viz, DionaeaFR, an ELK stack and much more. Lastly, almost 90 well-known malware analysis, forensics and network monitoring related tools are also present in the distribution.

 FEATURES:
  • Virtual appliance based on Xubuntu 12.04.4 LTS Desktop.
  • Distributed as a single OVA file, ready to be imported.
  • Full LAMP stack installed (Apache 2, MySQL 5), plus tools such as phpMyAdmin.
  • Kippo SSH honeypot, plus Kippo-Graph, Kippo-Malware, Kippo2MySQL and other helpful scripts.
  • Dionaea malware honeypot, plus DionaeaFR and other helpful scripts.
  • Amun malware honeypot, plus helpful scripts.
  • Glastopf web honeypot, along with Wordpot WordPress honeypot.
  • Conpot SCADA/ICS honeypot.
  • Honeyd low-interaction honeypot, plus Honeyd2MySQL, Honeyd-Viz and other helpful scripts.
  • LaBrea sticky honeypot, Tiny Honeypot, IIS Emulator and INetSim.
  • Thug and PhoneyC honeyclients for client-side attacks analysis, along with Maltrieve malware collector.
  • ELK stack: ElasticSearch, Logstash, Kibana for log analysis and visualization.
  • A full suite of security, forensics and anti-malware tools for network monitoring, malicious shellcode and PDF analysis, such as ntop, p0f, EtherApe, nmap, DFF, Wireshark, Recon-ng, ClamAV, ettercap, MASTIFF, Automater, UPX, pdftk, Flasm, Yara, Viper, pdf-parser, Pyew, Radare2, dex2jar and more.
  • Firefox add-ons pre-installed, plus extra helpful software such as GParted, Terminator, Adminer, VYM, Xpdf and more.

HoneyDrive 3 RELEASE NOTES:

1) HoneyDrive 3 has been created entirely from scratch. It is based on Xubuntu Desktop 12.04.4 LTS edition and it is distributed as a standalone OVA file that can be easily imported as a virtual machine using virtualization software such as VirtualBox and VMware.
2) All the honeypot programs from the previous version of HoneyDrive are included, while they have also been upgraded to their latest versions and converted almost entirely to cloned git repos for easier maintenance and updating. This latter fact on its own could be considered reason enough to release the new version.
3) Many new honeypot programs have been installed that really make HoneyDrive 3 “complete” in terms of honeypot technology, plus around 50(!) new security related tools in the fields of malware analysis, forensics and network monitoring.
4) The main honeypot software packages and BruteForce Lab’s projects reside in /honeydrive. The rest of the programs reside in /opt. The location of all software can be found inside the README.txt file on the desktop.
5) HoneyDrive 3 doesn’t make itself as known to the outside world as the previous version. There are no descriptive messages and apart from Kippo-Graph and Honeyd-Viz every other piece of software is not accessible from the outside (unless if you configure them otherwise, or even lock down Kippo-Graph and Honeyd-Viz as well).
A note on versioning: previous versions of HoneyDrive started with a zero (0.1 and 0.2) which seemed confusing to some. I didn’t like it either and in the end I decided to “renumber” those as versions 1 and 2, essentially making this new version HoneyDrive 3, .i.e the third official release.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS:

  1. Why use HoneyDrive?
    HoneyDrive saves you time! It has all the major honeypot-related software pre-installed and pre-configured to work out of the box (or with some configuration options of your liking). As I have seen many times in comments or support requests I get, setting up a honeypot system is not always something easy. This is especially true for new infosec enthusiasts or sysadmins and “hard” to set up software like Dionaea for example.
  2. What utilities and software are included in HoneyDrive?
    HoneyDrive contains all the major honeypot-related software and a ton more useful tools. For a complete list you’ll have to take a look at the README.txt file included in the virtual appliance (you’ll find it on the desktop) or online at the downloads section of SourceForge (link above).
  3. Why isn’t [insert-name-here] included in HoneyDrive?
    Unfortunately I can’t keep track of every different piece of software. But, I’m very open to suggestions about HoneyDrive! If you know a tool that could be of benefit please let me know by leaving a comment on this page and it will be included in the next release of HoneyDrive.
  4. What is the password for [insert-name-here]?
    Again, your best bet is reading the README.txt file included in the virtual appliance or found online at the downloads section of SourceForge (link above). Every password you will need is included in its appropriate section.

CHAGELOG:

HoneyDrive 3
  • Upgraded ALL existing honeypot software to the corresponding latest versions.
  • Converted ALL existing honeypot software to cloned git repos for easier maintenance.
  • Removed distinguishable HoneyDrive artifacts and secured access to web tools.
  • Added Kippo-Malware and Kippo2ElasticSearch.
  • Added Conpot SCADA/ICS honeypot.
  • Added PhoneyC honeyclient.
  • Added maltrieve malware downloader.
  • Added the ELK stack (ElasticSearch, Logstash, Kibana).
  • Added the following security tools: dnstop, MINI DNS Server, dnschef, The Sleuth Kit + Autopsy, TekCollect, hashMonitor, corkscrew, cryptcat, socat, hexdiff, pdfid, disitool, exiftool, Radare2, chaosreader, netexpect, tcpslice, mitmproxy, mitmdump, Yara, Recon-ng, SET (Social-Engineer Toolkit), MASTIFF + MASTIFF2HTML, Viper, Minibis, Nebula, Burp Suite, xxxswf, extract_swf, Java Decompiler (JD-GUI), JSDetox, extractscripts, AnalyzePDF, peepdf, officeparser, DensityScout, YaraGenerator, IOCExtractor, sysdig, Bytehist, PackerID, RATDecoders, androwarn, passivedns, BPF Tools, SpiderFoot, hashdata, LORG.
  • Added the following extra software: 7zip, Sagasu.
  • Added the following Firefox add-ons: Disconnect, Undo Closed Tabs Button, PassiveRecon.
  • Removed the following software: Kojoney, mwcrawler, Vidalia, ircd-hybrid, DNS Query Tool, DNSpenTest, VLC, Parcellite, Open Penetration Testing Bookmarks Collection (Firefox).
 Download: http://bruteforce.gr/honeydrive
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Shellter v1.7 - Dynamic ShellCode Injector Tool


















 Shellter is a dynamic shellcode injection tool, and probably the first dynamic PE infector ever created.It can be used in order to inject shellcode into native Windows applications (currently 32-bit apps only).The shellcode can be something yours or something generated through a framework, such as Metasploit.
Shellter takes advantage of the original structure of the PE file and doesn’t apply any modification such as changing memory access permissions in sections (unless the user wants and/or he chooses Basic Mode), adding an extra section with RWE access,and whatever would look dodgy under an AV scan.
Shellter uses a unique dynamic approach which is based on the execution flow of the target application.

How does it work?
Shellter uses a unique dynamic approach which is based on the execution flow of the target application. This means that no static/predefined locations are used for shellcode injection. Shellter will launch and trace the target, while at the same time will log the execution flow of the application.

What does it trace?
Shellter traces the entire execution flow that occurs in userland. That means,code inside the target application  itself (PE image), and code outside of it that might be in a system dll or on a heap, etc. This happens in order to ensure that functions actually belonging to the target executable, but are only used as callback functions for Windows APIs will not be missed.

However, the tracing engine will not log any instructions that are not in the memory range of the PE image of the target application, since these cannot be used as a reference to permanently inject the shellcode.

Why do I need Shellter?
Bypass AVs.
Executables created through Metasploit are most likely detected by most AV vendors. By using Shellter, you automatically have an infinitely polymorphic executable template, since you can use any 32-bit ‘standalone’ native Windows executable to host your shellcode. By ‘standalone’ means an executable that  doesn’t need any proprietary DLLs, apart from the system DLLs to load and run. For example, notepad.exe, and many other applications you can find online, or create by yourself as your own custom templates.

You can also use applications that make use of proprietary DLLs if those are not required to create the process in the first place, and are normally loaded later on if needed to execute code for a specific task. In case you select an application that needs one or more proprietary DLLs to create the process in the first place then you will have to include them in the same directory from where you load the main executable. However, this is not recommended since it is more convenient to have just a single executable to upload to the target.

What types of apps can I use?

You can basically use any 32-bit standalone (see above) native Windows application. Of course, since the main goal is to bypass an AV,you should always avoid packed applications or generally applications that have ‘dodgy’
characteristics such as sections with RWE permissions, more than one sections containing executable code etc..

Another reason why you should avoid packed applications is because advanced packers will also check for modifications of the file, so you will probably just break it. Advanced packers also perform various anti-reversing tricks which will detect Shellter’s debugging engine during tracing. If you are a lover of packers, you can first perform the injection and then pack the application with the packer of your choice.
The best bet is to use completely legitimate looking applications (ideally not packed) that are not flagged by any AV vendor for any reason.

These can be either yours, or something you got online.

Can I use encoded/self-decrypting payloads?
Shellter also supports encoded/self-decrypting payloads by taking advantage of  the Imports Table of the application. It will look for specific imported APIs that can be used on runtime to execute a self-decrypting payload without doing any modifications in the section’s characteristics from inside the PE Header.

At the moment 7 methods are supported for loading encoded payloads:

        VirtualAlloc
        VirtualAllocEx
        VirtualProtect
        VirtualProtectEx
        HeapCreate/HeapAlloc
        LoadLibrary/GetProcAddress
        CreateFileMapping/MapViewOfFile

If the target PE file doesn’t import by default the necessary API(s) then  a method wil be shown as ‘N/A’.
If a method requires more than one APIs, like for example method 4, it will also be shown as ‘N/A’ if the PE file doesn’t import all of them.If none of the encoded payload handler methods supported are available for the current PE target, you can choose to either select a non-encoded payload or to change the section’s characteristics from inside the PE Header. This last option has been added in order to provide more flexibility to the user in case he still wants to use a specific encoded payload along with the same PE file.

 Download: https://www.shellterproject.com/download/